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These shocking images shows the harsh reality of life in the shadow of an erupting volcano.

An estimated 30,000 people were displaced from their homes after Mount Sinabung on the Indonesian island of Sumatra started erupting on June 2, 2010 – after 400 years of laying dormant.

After lying dormant for 400 years, the volcano is devastating for locals

After lying dormant for 400 years, the volcano is devastating for locals

Officials have placed the 2,460m volcano under a high risk warning ever since, with eruptions continuing on a periodic basis.

Many villages on the volcano’s slopes are now almost empty as many residents abandon their homes to seek refuge in temporary shelters.

The images were shot in June 2015 by professional photographer Sutanta Aditya – who lost two friends in the major eruption of February 2014.

‘For me this subject is close to my heart and very saddening as I have lost two friends from this tragedy,’ he says.

Locals are urged to wear face protection to guard themselves from the harmful aerosols found in volcanic ash

Locals are urged to wear face protection to guard themselves from the harmful aerosols found in volcanic ash

Sutanta has since visited Sinabung on several occasions to document the seemingly impossible lives of those left behind at the foot of the volcanic giant – with crops destroyed by ash and the air thick with smoke.

Villager Serasi Sembiring says: ‘My feeling at this moment is complete sadness because the house that we’re living in has been destroyed.

‘We didn’t have any time to take any of our belongings or save any of our sentimental items.’

According to the photographer, some residents have returned to their villages but not everyone wants to go back due to the uncertain future.

Sinabung is one of 129 active volcanoes in Indonesia, which sits on the Pacific Ring of Fire – a belt of seismic activity running around the basin of the Pacific Ocean.

The economic impact of Sinabung has been devastating with the National Disaster Agency estimating it caused more than $100 million in damage over the last few years.

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