Wonky by nature or by design, have a look at these wobbly wonders…

1. The Gate of Europe Towers, Madrid, Spain

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iStockphoto

Built in Madrid, these towers have 26 floors and lean over 15 degrees. They were the first inclined skyscrapers in the world.

 

2. The Leaning Tower of Suurhusen, Germany

PA Photos

PA Photos

This late medieval steeple was once the most tilted tower in the world. It out-leans the Tower of Pisa by 1.22 degrees. The tower started to topple when the marshy land on which it was built was drained during the 19th century.

 

3. The Capital Gate tower, Abu Dhabi

PA Photos

PA Photos

This skyscraper has an 18 degree lean, making it the wonkiest building in the world.

 

4. The Dancing House, Prague, Czech Republic

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iStockphoto

Prague’s Dancing House was designed to symbolise the transition of Czechoslovakia from a communist regime into a parliamentary system.

 

5. Chesterfield Spire, Derbyshire

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iStockphoto

Legend has it that a virgin once married in the church, and the church was so surprised that the spire turned to look at the bride. If another virgin marries in the church, the spire will return to true again. Another legend is that a Bolsover blacksmith mis-shoed the Devil, who leaped over the spire in pain, knocking it out of shape. The twisting of the spire is actually believed to be caused by the lead heating unequally when the sun shines on it. The south side of the tower heats up, causing the lead there to expand at a greater rate than that of the north side of the tower.

 

6. The Leaning Tower of Pisa

iStockphoto

iStockphoto

Probably the most famous leaning building, The Leaning Tower of Pisa is actually a freestanding bell tower for the Cathedral. The tower’s tilt is caused by inadequate foundations and began during construction, the lean increasing in the decades before the structure was completed.

 

7. The Millennium Bridge, London

Lastly, the wobbly bridge! The bridge closed two days after opening due to a phenomenon known as ‘positive feedback’. The natural sway motion of the crowd walking caused small movements in the bridge. People, feeling this movement, naturally adjusted their walk and therefore amplified the sway of the bridge.

 

Have you visited any of these wonky buildings? Let us know in the comments section below…