Ever wondered why toad in the hole is called so, when there are clearly no toads involved? Or who Lorraine is and why there's a quiche named after her? Well, we may have the fun food facts that'll clear all this up…

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1. Cottage pie

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iStockphoto

Who doesn’t love this delicious dish on a cold, winter’s night? The creamy mash, the medley of mince and carrots, we love it all. With ketchup or gravy, this is a classic. But where does the ‘cottage’ come from? Shepherd’s pie is clearly called so because it’s full of lamb, but cottage pie is not full of cottages, is it? Well, the answer lies in the 1700s when potatoes were introduced as an affordable crop for people with limited means, and cottages were the homes to many of these folk! So now you know.

 

2. Toad in the hole

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iStockphoto

Yorkshire pudding, juicy sausages and lashings of gravy, but not a toad in sight. Or much of a hole to that matter. So what’s with the kooky name? Many culinary experts have suggested that it’s because the sausages look like little toads sticking their heads out of a hole. But if your sausages are green and covered in warts, maybe it’s time to pop to Asda…

 

3. Quiche Lorraine

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iStockphoto

Imagine having a quiche with your name on it. Pretty cool, right? Well, as cool as it sounds, this quiche was never actually named after a particular person. The boring fact behind this pastry is that it’s thus called because of the Lorraine region of France. Quiche being a French word, of course. But it’s also a song from the band The B-52’s in the 1980s!

 

4. Spotted dick

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iStockphoto

Yes, yes, we’ve all had a little giggle at its title. And who hasn’t stiffled their chuckles while ordering it in a restaurant? But why give such a yummy pud a double entendre? The ‘spotted’ is in reference to the dried fruit because they resemble spots, but no one seems to know where the ‘dick’ comes from. It could be a corruption of the word pudding, evolving to puddick, or a corruption of the word dough, but we like to think that a man called Richard just liked raisins a little too much…

 

5. Knickerbockerglory

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iStockphoto

A tall glass filled with ice cream and strawberry sauce? Yes please. But why the long name for such a simple, delicious dish? Well, knickerbockers are actually the name for a pair of trousers worn by men and women in the early 20th century. And red and white pairs were particularly popular among young girls, which is where the cold pudding comes from – the horizontal, alternating stripes are meant to resemble these long stockings. Who knew?